Articles by Joseph Delaney

Nostalgia

Why Pokémon Snap is the perfect Pokémon game

Pokémon Snap was released in 1999, and over the last 20 years, it’s the only game in the franchise that I find myself coming back to time and time again. I’d say about once a year, I spend a lazy weekend afternoon playing through this short, yet sweet adventure, and each time, I love it even more. And I’m obviously not the only one, because when Nintendo finally announced a long overdue sequel last week, the reactions all over the Internet showed just how loved this spinoff game is. Honestly, I never need a reason to revisit Pokémon Snap, but the announcement of the sequel just gives me even more of an excuse to jump right back into the best game in the series. Let’s have a look at what made this game so special, and what the new game can do to both recapture the magic of the original, while also improving and expanding on it.

Editorials

Remaking gaming’s past to escape its present

When I heard that Tony Hawk’s Pro Skater 1 and 2 were getting remakes, the opening lines to “Superman” by Goldfinger were the first thing to pop into my brain. I know I wasn’t the only millennial gamer this happened to, because when I looked the song up on YouTube, the comment section was full of people just like me saying “who’s here after the remake announcement?” The nostalgic rush that corny ska song gave me was overwhelming.

Reviews

The 10 best 2D platformers of the 2010s

As much as I appreciate how far gaming has come as an artistic medium, sometimes it’s just too much. Sometimes, I don’t want to play a game that makes me question the very concept of free will. Sometimes, I don’t want to make complex moral choices where neither outcome appears to be the right choice. Sometimes … I just wanna jump.

Reviews

Final Fantasy VII Remake: a refreshing twist on a classic

Remaking an old game is both a huge compliment and a biting insult. On one hand, you’re saying that this game is a beloved classic, and we need to devote resources toward recreating its brilliance for a modern audience. But then again, you’re also saying that this game doesn’t hold up to today’s standards, and it needs an update to remain relevant. Whether it’s simply a cosmetic makeover (like most HD remasters), or a ground-up overhaul that changes the game’s design (like Resident Evil 2 and 3’s remakes), the message is clear: these remakes are meant to replace the originals.
That’s what most people assumed Final Fantasy VII Remake was going to do.